Short Video Clip Library
Page 3 of 4

Name Seminar Title Description Category
Richard McIntosh Richard McIntosh Cell Division
(02:45 Min.)
Movie of CHO cells undergoing cell division Biological Mechanisms
Richard McIntosh Richard McIntosh Mitosis
(01:16 Min.)
Movie of chromosome behavior in a newt cell proceeding through mitosis. Biological Mechanisms
Richard McIntosh Richard McIntosh The mitotic spindle
(00:58 Min.)
A video of the mitotic spindle made using a polarized light microscope. Biological Mechanisms
Richard McIntosh Richard McIntosh Meiosis II
(00:55 Min.)
Video of meiosis II (very similar to mitosis) in crane fly spermatocyte using polarized light microscopy. Biological Mechanisms
Richard McIntosh Richard McIntosh Forces in the mitotic spindle
(04:07 Min.)
Discussion of the balance of forces in the mitotic spindle including the roles of kinesins 5 and 14 in the midzone and kinesin 13 at the poles. Microtubule dynamics are visualized by speckle microscopy. Biological Mechanisms
Richard McIntosh Richard McIntosh Chromosome movement
(03:10 Min.)
Micrographs showing that the attachment of microtubules to chromosomes is required for movement to spindle poles during anaphase. Evidence that dynein might be responsible for this movement. Biological Mechanisms
Richard McIntosh Richard McIntosh Kinetochore attachment
(02:13 Min.)
Movie of the micromanipulation of chromosomes showing that chromosomes only undergo congression (movement to metaphase plate) when both kinetochores are attached to microtubules. Biological Mechanisms
John McKinney John McKinney Tuberculosis-The disease
(10:15 Min.)
The stages of tuberculosis from infection through transmission Global Health and Energy
John McKinney John McKinney The persistency of tuberculosis
(03:49 Min.)
A model of the epidemiology of measles in comparison to TB explains why TB is so persistent in society. Global Health and Energy
John McKinney John McKinney Deaths due to tuberculosis represent just the “Tip of the Iceberg”
(03:09 Min.)
Two million people die from TB each year, however, nearly two billion people are latently infected creating an enormous public health crisis. Global Health and Energy
Ira Mellman Ira Mellman Innate and adaptive immunity
(06:53 Min.)
Mellman describes the first identification of these two branches of the immune response. Cell Biology and Medicine
Ira Mellman Ira Mellman Innate and adaptive immunity
(06:53 Min.)
Mellman describes the first identification of these two branches of the immune response. Cell Biology and Medicine
Ira Mellman Ira Mellman Videos of macrophages engulfing yeast
(06.53 Min.)
Using phase microscopy, macrophages are shown moving towards and engulfing the yeast. The enrichment of fluorescently labeled actin in the psuedopods that surround the yeast are shown in the second movie. In the third movie, fluorescence is used to follow phagocytosed yeast as they are delivered to lysosomes. Cell Biology and Medicine
Ira Mellman Ira Mellman The human immune response
(03:34 Min.)
An animation of the human immune response to a bacterial infection of the throat. Cell Biology and Medicine
Ira Mellman Ira Mellman Dendritic cells
(03:47 Min.)
The importance of dendritic cells to the immune response. Cell Biology and Medicine
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans Vertebrate vision
(01:51 Min.)
Overview of the vertebrate visual system. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans The vertebrate retina
(04:59 Min.)
A description of the vertebrate retina working down in size from cells to photoreceptors to visual pigment. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans The energy of five photons
(04:12 Min.)
A calculation of the energy transmitted by five photons, the minimum number detected by the human retina. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans Signal amplification in sensory receptors
(05:08 Min.)
How rhodopsin, transducin and cGMP phosphodiesterase amplify the signal from a single photon to detectable levels. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans How do we see our surroundings?
(03:40 Min.)
The distribution of rods and cones in the human retina is discussed along with implications for how we view our surroundings. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans Optical illusion
(04:05 Min.)
The Hering optical illusion explained. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans Optical illusion
(01:41 Min.)
Explanation of the “vase or two faces?” optical illusion. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans Newton’s experiment
(05:40 Min.)
Newton’s first experiments showing that light could be divided into its component colors and recombined to form other colors. Neuroscience
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans An explanation of reduced color vision or color blindness
(01:21 Min.)
John Dalton’s description of his reduced color vision and an example of how a person with only two color receptors may see the world. Neuroscience
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Why study cone snail toxins?
(03:58 Min.)
In his first lab in the Philippines, Dr. Olivera had access to cone snails but little lab equipment, however, an ingenious assay allowed the paralytic fractions from snail toxins to be identified. Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Peptides from Conus geographus
(03:32 Min.)
Identification of the first paralytic peptides from Conus geographus as similar to cobratoxin and tetrodotoxin. Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera More pharmacologically active peptides
(03:20 Min.)
Identification of over one hundred pharmacologically active peptides from a single snail toxin. Work of an undergraduate student! Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Cone snail toxin as a drug
(02:20 Min.)
A cone snail toxin, omega conotoxin MVIIA, has been approved as a drug for intractable pain. Again work started by an undergraduate student. Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Peptides to capture prey
(02:24 Min.)
There are tens of thousands of conus peptides. One use of all of these peptides is to capture prey Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Description of the venom delivery system of cone snails
(02:21 Min.)
Description of the venom delivery system of cone snails. Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Cone snail hunting strategies
(03:36 Min.)
Part 3 #1 Different fish hunting cone snails have different toxins and consequently they have developed different strategies for hunting fish. Video and diagram of harpooning strategy vs net strategy. Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Why do cone snails need so many peptides in their toxins?
(04:51 Min.)
In his first lab in the Philippines, Dr. Olivera had access to cone snails but little lab equipment, however, an ingenious assay allowed the paralytic fractions from snail toxins to be identified. Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Toto Olivera Toto Olivera Room for discovery
(01:19 Min.)
Cone snails include approximately 700 species with thousands of pharmacologically active peptides. Turrid snails include about 12,000 species with millions of peptides about which nothing is known. Chemical Biology & Biophysics
Martin Raff Martin Raff Regulation of cell growth
(04:44 Min.)
What controls the size of an animal? Why are we so much bigger than a mouse? Biological Mechanisms
Martin Raff Martin Raff More regulation of cell growth
(02:26 Min.)
What controls local rates of cell growth? Why don’t we look like a mouse? Biological Mechanisms
David Roos David Roos Apicomplexan specific organelles
(02:15 Min.)
An electron micrograph of Toxoplasma shows the apical complex. This is followed by a video of host cell invasion by a parasite. Global Health and Energy
David Roos David Roos Toxoplasma replication is critical for pathogeneis
(02:50 Min.)
Electron micrographs of cells at increasing times post infection show increasing numbers of parasites inside of the host cell. Global Health and Energy
David Roos David Roos Nuclear division in Toxoplasma
(01:09 Min.)
A movie showing that nuclear division is distinct from cell division in Toxoplasma. Global Health and Energy
David Roos David Roos DNA and organellar replication
(02:53 Min.)
The timetable of DNA and organellar replication is well defined in apicomplexans. Global Health and Energy
David Roos David Roos The apicoplast and evolution
(02:21 Min.)
Apicoplast DNA highly resembles DNA from blue-green algae. A discussion of how toxoplasma might have acquired the apicoplast organelle during evolution. Global Health and Energy
1 2 3 4